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Archive for the ‘Passover’ Category

His first meal of the day at 1:15 p.m. Brunch?

This is Joe’s power breakfast today, or was it lunch?

Cinnamon Toast Matzo

  • 1 sheet matzo
  • butter
  • cinnamon sugar

Spread the matzo with some softened butter. Put it in the microwave for 8-10 seconds for the butter to melt. Sprinkle on some cinnamon-sugar, then put it back in the microwave for another 10 seconds. Delicious (not nutritious).

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I used last night’s left overs and created this gourmet lunch of a matzo pizza topped with lemon asparagus and matzo meal baked chicken.

Gourmet Matzo Pizza

  • 1 sheet matzo
  • 2 Tbs. (approx) tomato or pizza sauce
  • 2 stalks asparagus (of other vegetable), cut into pieces
  • 1 baked chicken thigh, sliced
  • 1/4 c. shredded cheese

Spread the sauce evenly over the matzo, then top with asparagus and chicken. Sprinkle on the cheese. Microwave on high for 1 minute.

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Passover Blintzes

For the bletlach (crepe):

  • 1 c. matzo meal
  • 2 c. (plus) milk
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 Tbs. sugar

Mix together all the ingredients and relax with a good book for 20-30 minutes. Heat butter in an 8″ crepe pan (or non-stick pan), and ladle in 1/3-1/2 cup of batter. When the bottom is brown, turn over with a spatula, or flip in the air if brave. Brown the second side adding more butter as needed. Fill, fold, and return to pan to brown.
Serve topped with preserves.

For the filling:

  • 16 oz. ricotta
  • 2 Tbs. cream cheese
  • 1 Tbs. sour cream
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tbs. sugar

Whisk together all ingredients. Fill and fold.

For the topping:

  • 1 c. sour cream
  • 1 Tbs. brown sugar

The blintzes, filled and returned to the pan for more cooking. Since the filling has raw eggs, be sure and cook them thoroughly.

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Rae and I have been showing some enthusiastic teenagers a few of our secrets to good Jewish cooking. For the past few weeks we have been making a lot of Passover recipes. Matzo brie, or fried matzo, is a Passover staple. What was surprising, and really kind of delightful, was to discover that Rae’s family and my family have two completely different versions of the same dish. Ours is cooked up quite fast, into browned chopped up bits, and then served with a mound of jam, eingie. Rae’s is slow-cooked, using mushrooms and onions, and served in one giant, fluffed up wheel, which is cut into wedges to serve.

Rae’s Matzo Brie

  • 6 sheets matzo
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1/2 lb. mushrooms, halved or sliced
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • olive oil for frying

In a very large pan, saute the onion until almost golden, then stir in the mushrooms and let cook for a few more minutes. Soak the matzos in water, briefly, then drain and stir in the eggs, salt, onions and mushrooms. Add a little more oil to the pan, and when it’s hot pour in the matzo mixture. Turn the heat to medium and let it slowly brown, for about 8 minutes. Slide a spatula around the edges and check the bottom of the matzo brie. When it is a deep golden brown it is ready to be flipped. Take a flat platter that is a bit larger than the pan, place over the top of the pan, and turn it all upside down, inverting the matzo brie onto the platter. Add a little more oil to the pan, and when it’s hot, slide the matzo brie back into the pan, uncooked side down. Cook for another 8-10 minutes until golden brown on the bottom, and then carefully slide onto the serving platter. Cut into wedges to serve.

Soak the matzo, stir in eggs. Add slow-sauteed onions and mushrooms and stir it all together.

Fry it up.

Loosen the edges and flip the matzo brie upside down onto a platter.

Slip it back into the pan, uncooked side down.

After the second side is golden brown, carefully loosen the edges, and slip it back onto the platter to serve.

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A hot plate of fried matzo, topped with our favorite, eingie.

 

Break the matzo before soaking.

Mix the soaked matzo with egg and salt, and pour into a hot, buttered pan to brown.

If you’d enjoy the recipe, please visit the Apple iTunes store to download my app, iNosh. Here’s the link for that:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/inosh/id777362589?ls=1&mt=8

I’m donating half of the proceeds to Mazon, A Jewish Response to Hunger.

And here’s a preview of some of the content on the app. For now, it’s only available for iPad users.

iNosh blog ad v2

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A matzo ball, swimming in soup.

My mother’s matzo balls were always “puchie”*, and my grandmother’s were dense. My grandmother, a wonderful cook, just could not get them to be like my mom’s even though they used the same recipe—or so they thought. It turned out that my mother was beating her egg whites; Nana was not. Today I came across my mother’s recipe, which in true form was merely a list of ingredients. I mixed it together, folded in the beaten egg whites last, and it looked awful. So I threw that batch away and began again. This time I folded in the egg whites earlier, and it worked! These are the lightest, fluffiest matzo balls you’ll ever taste.

*Puchie is my spelling for the Yiddish word for fluffy. The “ch” is made at the back of your throat, as if you are beginning to spit.

 

If you’d enjoy the recipe, please visit the Apple iTunes store to download my app, iNosh. Here’s the link for that:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/inosh/id777362589?ls=1&mt=8

I’m donating half of the proceeds to Mazon, A Jewish Response to Hunger.

And here’s a preview of some of the content on the app. For now, it’s only available for iPad users.

iNosh blog ad v2

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Charoset

Nana's wooden bowl and chopping tool.

Every family has their own version of this Passover recipe. This is our family’s. My sister Maralee and I look forward to the ritual of making this together, chopping the apples by hand in our grandmother’s wooden bowl. When I was very little I asked my grandmother if I could have that bowl, which I think she received when she got married in 1920. She told me that she would give it to me when I got married. And now it is mine.

Charoset

  • 20 small apples, peeled and cored — red delicious, gala, or a combination of your choice of a flavorful, sweet variety
  • 3-1/2 c. chopped walnuts (we grind these in a nut grinder)
  • 2-1/2 c. kosher wine (Manischewitz is our choice)
  • 7 tsp. cinnamon

Chop the apples until very small (see photo). Stir in the rest, a little at a time, tasting as you go. Add more or less of the nuts/wine/cinnamon to suit your taste.

The finished charoset on our seder plate.

Maralee peels the apples, cores them, and places them into cold water so that they don't brown. (She likes to see how long she can make the peel.)

The chopping begins.

We're getting there, but still more chopping to do. Maralee and I take turns.

We are finally satisfied with the small size of the apple pieces.

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